Pluto and New Horizons in review

On 27 October 2016, controllers for the New Horizons deep-space mission achieved a milestone. They got back the last data from their spacecraft’s flyby of the dwarf planet Pluto. Alice Bowman, head of the mission team, said the team would first verify the data. They then will order New Horizons to erase its memories. New Horizons must do this ahead of a planned rendezvous with another Kuiper Belt object (2014 MU69). It will make this flyby on or about 1 January 2019). Continue reading

Carbon monoxide on Pluto

The rocket probe New Horizons sent back more pictures from the Pluto system. On Friday (17 July 2015) NASA released some of them. Among them: a frozen lake of carbon monoxide. This lake covers most of the western lobe of Tombaugh Regio (the “heart” on Pluto). Continue reading

Pluto younger than expected

The New Horizons spacecraft sent back the first of many photographs it took as it flew through the Pluto-Charon system. (See this article by Amanda Barnett at CNN.) These photographs present yet another problem for uniformitarian astronomers. Pluto and Charon both have surface features (or in one case the lack of surface features) that suggest youth, not great age, for these bodies. Conventional astronomers will no doubt insist on considering Pluto and Charon about 4.56 billion years ancient. If so, they must explain mountains with sharp features, and (on Charon) relatively few impact craters. Continue reading

Pluto: accidental creation

In about two and one-half days (14 July 2015, viagra 11:50 UTC), a ship named New Horizons will pass close to the dwarf planet Pluto. It has approached Pluto for six months, after a voyage of nine and a half years. And already it has found, or confirmed, evidence of the true nature, and origin, of Pluto. We must regard Pluto as a recent creation. And an accidental one. A product of the most violent event the earth has ever known, the one event worthy of the name cataclysm. Continue reading

Enceladus confounds experts

Enceladus, recipe ninth moon of Saturn, ailment confounded planetary scientists when Voyager 2 reconnoitered it in 1981. Every rocket-probe reconnaissance of Enceladus confounds them more. If this and all other objects that large or larger in our solar system are billions of years old, pill why does Enceladus look and act so young? Conventional creation scientists and advocates assume it is as young as the earth – 6,019 years by the Ussher reckoning. In fact Enceladus is even younger – 5,300 years young, give or take a hundred years. Continue reading

Water beyond the belt

NASA, two days ago (March 12, 2015), confirmed what planet-watchers have known for years. Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter, has a thick layer of ice, with an ocean beneath. Ganymede becomes the third large moon in the solar system to harbor such vast amounts of liquid water. And once again, NASA and those who work the Science Beat indulge themselves, speculating about Life Beyond Earth. Well, NASA might have good reason to find life on these three moons. But that reason would never occur to them. The subglacial oceans of Ganymede and Europa (moons of Jupiter) and Enceladus (moon of Saturn), and their respective ice coverings, likely came from Earth. And this water likely brought living things with it. Continue reading

Comet 67P explodes convention

In November of 2014, the European Space Agency achieved a milestone in planetary science. They successfully landed a craft of man on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. That alone set the world buzzing, as well it might. The landing craft landed nearly in shadow, and had to “hibernate” shortly afterward. But not before sending back a wealth of pictures and other data. In any other context, the scientists involved would have no reservations on their pride. Why then, this time, did those scientists withhold some of their findings for weeks, if not months? Because those findings did something scientists say they appreciate, but don’t. They surprised them. And in surprising them, they vexed them. Because those scientists cannot explain those findings. Continue reading

‘Dinosaur eggs’ on Comet 67P

No, the European Space Agency’s Philae lander did not find literal dinosaur eggs on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The experts at the imaging team for Philae’s high-resolution OSIRIS camera gave that name to what they did find. These large, rounded boulders, one to three meters across, cover the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Those experts, according to Eric Hand, journalist for Science, call these the building blocks of comets. They probably speak correctly. But they might not know a certain creation scientist said thirteen years ago astronomers would find such rounded boulders on comets. Continue reading

Philae sees organics on comet

The Philae probe settled into deep sleep in her shaded resting place on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. But before she slept, she sent back information on her most important finding to date. The “atmosphere” (or what passes for one) of the comet holds organic molecules. This finding revives an old debate on how life came to earth. Did life arise on earth? Or did comets bring it to earth? Continue reading

Sea plankton in earth orbit?

The Russian flight director for the International Space Station said this week two cosmonauts had found sea plankton, or traces of them, on the outer hull and window of a Russian module of the International Space Station. If this proves out, they might have proved a key part of the hydroplate theory of the Global Flood without knowing it. Continue reading