Sedna has company, and lots of it

About ten years ago, astronomers discovered a single dwarf planet, which they named Sedna, beyond any then-known object in the solar system. Its discoverers half suspected it was a freak of nature. It wasn’t, and isn’t. Another astronomical team now reports a new object, a companion to Sedna. They say further this new object won’t be the last such object anyone discovers. But they miss one important implication. Other teams will likely confirm their opinion by discovering a third Sedna, and a fourth, and many more. When that happens, astronomers will have to admit the solar system is significantly heavier than they suppose. And that extra weight, far from supporting their conventional models, undermines them. Continue reading

God, nature, or dice?

Any time people discuss the Creation account in the Bible, those taking part have to decide. What, in essence, will they believe in? Who, or what, created the universe, the earth, and life, including human life? Did God create something perfect, as the Bible says? Did nature, having a God-like (or Goddess-like) power, create itself (herself)? Or did everything come from a roll of dice in a cosmic game of chance? Continue reading

Ararat: plucked from the swirling flow

Recently I sought to pick the brains of ‘somebody in the know’ concerning the Flood, but I won’t say ‘who’. The person gave a really good response to my question but then added something else that I had to seriously consider. [I love picking brains because ideas are tossed around that would normally not be given a second thought!] The on-going debate is ‘Did the Ark have a skeg on one end, and a large sail-like projection on the opposite end?’ Continue reading

Gravitational waves – what they mean

Two days ago, John Kovacs, of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, claimed a momentous discovery. He said he had seen “direct evidence of cosmic inflation,” according to Mike Wall at Space.com. The New York Times picked up the story almost at once. So did Nature, to whom Kovacs has already submitted several papers. (See their announcement here.) Specifically, Kovacs says he and his team saw gravitational waves left over from the first moments of time after the Big Bang. Continue reading

Water deep in mantle? Not so fast

Two days ago, geologists at the University of Alberta spoke publicly about a result years in making. They said they found, on the ground, a mineral others only guessed lies about 320 miles deep. They further said this mineral held water. They published their findings, and a letter explaining them, in the journal Nature. Continue reading

Asteroids: two close passes in 2 days

In the last two days, two asteroids have come closer to earth than the moon. These asteroids follow cometary, or highly eccentric, orbits. As such they defy conventional theories of the origins of comets or asteroids. For that reason they lend further credence to another, more radical, yet simpler, explanation. Which is: asteroids and comets formed from material that launched into space during the Global Flood. Continue reading